Nunatsiaq News
TAISSUMANI February 17, 2018 - 2:30 pm

Taissumanni, Feb. 17

Thank you, Peter Freuchen

KENN HARPER

Sometime this spring a small cheque will arrive in my mailbox.

It will come from the Public Lending Right Program of the Canada Council for the Arts. It will be based on a sampling from certain libraries of the number of my published copyrighted titles that were held by Canadian libraries during...

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TAISSUMANI February 10, 2018 - 9:30 am

Taissumani: Feb. 10, 2018

The Baffin Fair

KENN HARPER

Special to Nunatsiaq News

Whaling was an occupation fraught with hazards, especially in the dangerous waters of Davis Strait. In 1819, 10 ships were lost in Baffin Bay. But that was only the beginning.

During the decade of the 1830s, the British Arctic whaling industry suffered a series of...

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TAISSUMANI January 23, 2015 - 1:07 pm

Taissumani, Jan. 23

Taissumani – A Look Backward and Forward

KENN HARPER

This week marks the 10th anniversary of Taissumani. That’s a lot of stories — over 500 — and a lot of research.

But this week’s column will also be my last Taissumani as a regular weekly column.

I have appreciated the comments that readers have made on many of the stories. Often these were made...

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TAISSUMANI January 16, 2015 - 9:31 am

Taissumani, Jan. 16

Angulaalik: A Killing at Perry River – Part 2

KENN HARPER

Last week I wrote about Angulaalik and the unfortunate death of Utuittuq (Otoetok). I reproduced the pidgin English translation of the confession letter that he sent to the police in Cambridge Bay.

When Angulaalik’s family provided the researcher, Robin McGrath, with a carbon copy of Angulaalik’s...

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TAISSUMANI January 09, 2015 - 8:17 am

Taissumani, Jan. 9

Angulalik: A Killing at Perry River

KENN HARPER

Angulaalik was a remarkable Inuk from what is now the Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut. Born about 1898, he lived most of his life in Queen Maud Gulf, southeast of Cambridge Bay.

Captain C. T. Pedersen, an American trader, travelled regularly on his schooner from San Francisco and Seattle into the...

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TAISSUMANI January 05, 2015 - 11:59 am

Taissumani, Jan. 2

Robert Hood – Passion and Murder in the Arctic

KENN HARPER

In 1819, the British explorer John Franklin set out on his first Arctic land expedition.

Its purpose was to explore the northern coast of North America eastward from the mouth of the Coppermine River. In June of 1821, Franklin and his party left Fort Enterprise, the headquarters that they had...

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TAISSUMANI December 19, 2014 - 5:40 pm

Taissumani, Dec. 19

The Belcher Island Murders – Part 3

KENN HARPER

The judicial party arrived in the Belcher Islands on Aug. 18. Judge Plaxton was from the Ontario Supreme Court but was also a Stipendiary Magistrate for the Northwest Territories.

R. A. Olmsted, from the federal Department of Justice, was the prosecutor. J. P. Madden, a lawyer from Ottawa served...

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TAISSUMANI December 12, 2014 - 10:12 am

Taissumani, Dec. 12

The Belcher Island Murders — Part 2

KENN HARPER

Last week I wrote about the beginnings of the religious fervour that resulted in the deaths of a number of Inuit in the Belcher Islands in 1942. Two local men, Peter Sala and Charlie Ouyerack, had proclaimed themselves to be God and Jesus.

By the end of February, the death toll was three. But in...

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TAISSUMANI December 05, 2014 - 12:45 pm

Taissumani, Dec. 5

“And the Stars Shall Fall from Heaven” — The Belcher Island Murders

KENN HARPER

One night in February 1942 a shooting star streaked through the night sky above the Belcher Islands, a remote island group in southern Hudson Bay.

Inuit looked heavenward and remembered a Bible verse from Matthew 24: “and the stars shall fall from heaven… and they shall see the Son of Man coming...

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TAISSUMANI November 28, 2014 - 3:11 pm

Taissumani, Nov. 28

Death On An Ice Island

KENN HARPER

T3 was an ice island seven miles long and three miles wide drifting in the Arctic Ocean, when 20 researchers arrived there in May 1970.

They were from the United States Weather Bureau and were to remain for five months. The atmosphere was cozy despite the sometimes minus 60 degree outdoor...

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TAISSUMANI November 20, 2014 - 10:57 am

Taissumani, Nov. 21

Who Killed Charles Francis Hall?

KENN HARPER

Last week I wrote about the death of Charles Francis Hall on the Polaris expedition.

Hall was the only person to die on that expedition. Eventually, when the survivors had returned to the United States, a government inquiry was held.

George Tyson, the ice-master, spoke of Hall’s conviction that...

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TAISSUMANI November 14, 2014 - 11:23 am

Taissumani, Nov. 14

How Do You Spell Murder? — The Death of Charles Francis Hall

KENN HARPER

Charles Francis Hall began his third expedition to the Arctic on June 29, 1871. This was the most ambitious one of all.

The previous two were in search of information on the missing Franklin expedition, but this one would be an audacious attempt to reach the North Pole by ship. The steamer...

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TAISSUMANI November 07, 2014 - 10:12 am

Taissumani, Nov. 7

The 19th Inuit Studies Conference

KENN HARPER

In 1974, at a time when the Inuit of Nunavik were negotiating their land claims settlement, researchers at Laval university established a private non-profit organization called Association Inuksiutiit Katimajiit.

Its objectives were to collect data on research into Inuit culture, language and...

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TAISSUMANI October 31, 2014 - 7:51 am

Taissumani, Oct. 31

The Sadness of Miss Bill

KENN HARPER

Life was not kind to Eqariussaq, or Miss Bill as the Peary’s always called her, for she was unable to bear children. Knud Rasmussen once wrote, “There is only one woman whom I pity among the Polar Eskimos — the woman who has no children.”

Eqariussaq’s marriage to Ahngoodloo did not survive. But...

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TAISSUMANI October 24, 2014 - 9:26 am

Taissumani, Oct. 24

Eqariussaq, AKA Miss Bill

KENN HARPER

In 1893 Josephine Peary accompanied her husband, the explorer Robert Peary, on an over-wintering trip to northern Greenland. This was daring on her part because she was in the last stages of pregnancy when she left the United States.

On Sept. 12 she gave birth to her first child, a daughter which...

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TAISSUMANI October 17, 2014 - 12:09 pm

Taissumani, Oct. 17

Mowat, Porsild, and “The Case of the Disappearing Eskimos”

KENN HARPER

In 1947, an aspiring young Canadian writer travelled into the Barren Lands of the Kivalliq Region. His name was Farley Mowat.

The book that resulted from this and a subsequent trip into the interior was published to great acclaim in 1952, under the title People of the Deer. The people he wrote...

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TAISSUMANI October 10, 2014 - 10:51 am

Taissumani, Oct. 11

Father Gasté’s Remarkable Journey

KENN HARPER

When Samuel Hearne became the first white man to pass through the area of Nueltin Lake in the late 1700s, there was as yet no Inuit presence there.

It was not until the early 1800s that Inuit moved into the region. These Inuit, who came to be known as the Ahiarmiut, occupied an area tucked into...

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TAISSUMANI October 03, 2014 - 11:09 am

Taissumani, Oct. 3

The Settling of the Kivalliq Region

KENN HARPER

It is not generally realized that until the mid-1700s, most of the Kivalliq coast south of Rankin Inlet was not inhabited by Inuit, but rather by Chipewyan Indians.

The late anthropologist Ernest (Tiger) Burch advanced a theory, generally accepted, and summed up by the scholar Renee Fossett, about...

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TAISSUMANI September 26, 2014 - 10:17 am

Taissumani, Sept. 26

How “–miut” Was Used a Century Ago

KENN HARPER

Last week I wrote about how the suffix “-miut” is used in Inuktitut today, to describe “the people of” a certain place (for example, Iglulingmiut) but often used too, in a general geographical sense (like Nunavummiut.)

But before Inuit largely abandoned camp life and moved into the settlements...

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TAISSUMANI September 19, 2014 - 11:35 am

Taissumani, Sept. 19

What Does “–miut” Mean?

KENN HARPER

Everyone in the Arctic, whether they speak Inuktitut or not, has heard this suffix attached to a word, either in Inuktitut or English, and usually a place name. And most know that it means “the people of (that place.)

And so you hear that certain people are Iglulingmiut (the people of Igloolik.)...

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TAISSUMANI September 12, 2014 - 3:37 pm

Taissumani, Sept. 12

Grave Robbing

KENN HARPER

The explorer was travelling in northern Greenland with one south Greenlander and two young Inughuit — Polar Eskimos — both about 20.

It was summer and travelling conditions were dreadful. The explorer had taken some burial goods from an Inuit grave a few days earlier – small things – a pin, a...

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TAISSUMANI September 05, 2014 - 5:14 pm

Taissumani, Sept. 5

What Makes a Good Teacher?

KENN HARPER

What makes a good teacher? This age-old question has never been satisfactorily answered, least of all by the meritless arguments advanced by those who tout “merit pay” for teachers as the panacea for everything that ails the education system.

When I was in Grade 8 (then the graduating year from...

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TAISSUMANI August 29, 2014 - 8:40 pm

Taissumani, Aug. 29

The Strategic Importance of Ellesmere Island

KENN HARPER

It must be near summer’s end because Stephen (not my brother) Harper is doing his annual tour of the Canadian Arctic, with the attendant sovereignty overtones that that entails. So let’s take a look at how some of that sovereignty came about.

In the 1920s and 1930s, Canada was busy establishing...

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TAISSUMANI August 22, 2014 - 12:48 pm

Taissumani, Aug. 22

Inughuit Hunters and the Thule Act

KENN HARPER

The Thule Act was a unique piece of legislation passed by a group of Inughuit hunters in the Thule District of northern Greenland, without recourse to, or permission from, any national government.

Knud Rasmussen had established his Thule Station, a trading post, in the district in 1909. The Danish...

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TAISSUMANI August 15, 2014 - 9:53 am

Taissumani, Aug. 15

The Expulsion of the Inughuit

KENN HARPER

The Inughuit live in northwestern Greenland north of Melville Bay. Their traditional territory is a strip of land hemmed in between the frigid waters of the Arctic and the inland ice that covers most of Greenland, a coastal strip 600 km long. They are the northernmost human society in the...

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